Federal Grand Jury indictments released

United States Attorney Trent Shores announced yesterday the results of the October 2018 Federal Grand Jury. The following individuals have been charged with violations of law ranging from “dark web” activity to criminal invasion.  Indictments must be proven in a court of law beyond a reasonable doubt to overcome a defendant’s presumption of innocence. 

George Lee Brown, Jr. Felon in Possession of Firearm and Ammunition. George Lee Brown, Jr., 34, of Tulsa, was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, which included a Glock 23 pistol. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Tulsa Police Department, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, and the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigations are the investigative agencies.

Barbarito De Leon-Compean. Reentry of Removed Alien. Barbarito De Leon-Compean, 53, of Tulsa, was charged with having returned to the United States unlawfully after being deported on March 19, 2015, from Brownsville, Texas. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement is the investigative agency.

Mario De Leon-Meza. Reentry of a Removed Alien. Mario De Leon-Meza, 41, of Tulsa, was charged with having returned to the United States unlawfully after being deported on February 25, 2015, at Del Rio, Texas.  If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Bureau of Immigration and Customs Enforcement is the investigative agency.

Nickolaus Antwann Douglas. Felon in Possession of a Firearm and Ammunition. Nickolaus Antwann Douglas, 37, of Tulsa, was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, which included a Taurus, PT709 Slim, 9mm pistol. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Tulsa Police Department and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are the investigative agencies.

Blaine Clinton Ford. Felon in Possession of a Firearm and Ammunition; Possession of Heroin With Intent to Distribute; Possession of Methamphetamine With Intent to Distribute; Possession of a Firearm in Furtherance of a Drug Trafficking Crime. Blaine Clinton Ford, 27, of Bixby, was charged with being a felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition, including a Taurus, PT111 Millennium G2, 9mm Lugar pistol; possession with intent to distribute heroin; possession with intent to distribute methamphetamine; and possession of a firearm to further a drug trafficking crime. If convicted, he could face a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for the felon in possession of a firearm and ammunition charge; a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $1 million dollar fine for each possession with intent to distribute a controlled substance charge; and a maximum penalty of life in prison and a $250,000 fine for the charge of possession of a firearm to further a drug trafficking crime. The Bixby Police Department, the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, the Oklahoma State Bureau of Investigation, and the Drug Enforcement Administration are the investigative agencies.

Bobby Joe Hurt, III. Felon in Possession of Firearms. Bobby Joe Hurt, III, 25, of Sapulpa, was charged with being a felon in possession of firearms, including a Heritage, Rough Rider, .22 caliber revolver and a Smith & Wesson 13-1, .357 caliber revolver.  If convicted, he faces maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Creek County Sheriff’s Office and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are the investigative agencies.

Aaron Michael Jackson. Theft of Mail by United States Postal Service Employee; Possession of Stolen Mail. Aaron Michael Jackson, 28, of Tulsa, was charged with stealing items contained in letters, packages, and mail intended to be sent through the mail system, and with being in possession of those stolen items.  If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine for each charge. The Office of the Inspector General, United States Post Office, is the investigative agency.

Gerardo Regalado-Cuevas. Failure to Register as a Sex Offender. Gerardo Regalado-Cuevas, 63, of Tulsa, was charged with failing to register as a sex offender from 2014 to present. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The United States Marshals Service is the investigative agency.

Kerry Sloan. Transportation with Intent to Engage in Criminal Sexual Activity. Kerry Sloan, 55, of Harker Heights, in the Killeen, Texas area, was charged with knowingly transporting a minor with the intent that the minor would engage in sexual activity with him. If convicted, he faces the maximum penalty of life in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Pittsburg County Sheriff’s Office, the Killeen Police Department, and the Tulsa Police Department are the investigative agencies.

Raelyn Briana Sutton. Conveying False and Misleading Information Concerning an Explosive Device. Raelyn Briana Sutton, 26, of Spavinaw, Oklahoma, was charged with intentionally conveying false and misleading information in a phone call to the Rogers County Court Clerk’s Office by claiming that a bomb would go off in five minutes. If convicted, she faces a maximum penalty of five years in prison and a $250,000 fine. The Rogers County Sheriff’s Office, the Grand River Dam Authority Police, and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are the investigative agencies.

Levi William Welker. Distribution of Child Pornography; Possession of Child Pornography; Enticement; Tampering With a Victim- 2 counts; Tampering With Documents. Levi William Welker, 27, of Tulsa, was charged with knowingly possessing and distributing child pornography; enticing a minor to engage in sexual activity; attempting to persuade another person to destroy evidence; interfering with reporting of an offense; and destruction of evidence. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for each charge of distribution of child pornography and possession of child pornography. Additionally, he faces a maximum penalty of life in prison and a $250,000 fine for the enticement charge and a maximum penalty of 20 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for each tampering with a victim charge and tampering with a document charge. The Federal Bureau of Investigation and the Tulsa Police Department are the investigative agencies.

Travis Christian Wilbur. Drug Conspiracy. Travis Christian Wilbur, 29, of Miami, Oklahoma, was charged with conspiring to possess and distribute 500 grams or more of methamphetamine. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of life imprisonment and $10 million dollar fine. The Drug Enforcement Administration and the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives are the investigative agencies.

John Andrew Williams. Possession of Fifteen or More Counterfeit Access Devices; Possession of Device-Making Equipment; Wire Fraud. John Andrew Williams, 47, of Pembroke Pines, Florida, was charged with possessing 15 or more counterfeit gift cards and with using credit card encoder equipment to re-encode the depleted gift cards fraudulently with bank account and identification information belonging to other persons, which he had obtained illegally from the “dark web.” Williams was also charged with purchasing U.S. postage stamps from kiosks throughout the United States and selling the stamps on Craigslist by means of wire communications. If convicted, he faces a maximum penalty of 10 years in prison and a $250,000 fine for the possession of fifteen or more counterfeit access devices charge; 15 years in prison and a fine of $250,000 for the possession of device-making equipment charge; and 30 years in prison and a fine of $1 million for the wire fraud charge.  The Rogers County Sheriff’s Office and the United States Postal Service are the investigative agencies.

Indictments must be proven in a court of law beyond a reasonable doubt to overcome a defendant’s presumption of innocence.

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