Category Archives: Science

Field Day focus on dove, quail, pheasant

Landowners can improve game bird populations on their land when they employ management techniques proven successful. To help landowners make a difference, the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation will host a Dove, Quail and Pheasant Management Field Day on Sept. 5, and signup is underway. Continue reading

The destruction of patient-centered care

“Medicare-for-all” medicine is the ultimate goal of progressives or “liberals,” fully embraced by Democrat candidates in the midterms. Candidates claim “single-payer” government-run medicine will “solve” all the problems of Obamacare and our “broken,” purportedly free-market system.

Liberal proposals ignore or deny the massive cost burden to taxpayers of “free healthcare,” the long delays, and the limited treatment options that plague every taxpayer-funded (socialized) medical system in the world, from Canada and the UK, to Cuba and Venezuela—and increasingly to U.S Medicare and Medicaid.  Continue reading

Hysterical plastic entertainment

Opinion: Matt Walsh in The Daily Wire takes fun away from the latest hysterical crisis. He begins, “There is nothing wrong with trying to cut down on waste. There is nothing wrong with trying to cut down on the amount of straws we use. But when you use fake statistics to whip up hysteria, and you indulge in extreme exaggeration and blatant falsehood and especially when you use these exaggerations and falsehoods as the basis for unnecessary laws, then it becomes incumbent on honest people to step in and correct the record.”  Continue reading

NASA toolkit promotes free satellite data

NASA’s Technology Transfer program has created an online resource to promote commercial use of data and the software tools needed to work with it.

While NASA’s policy of free and open remote-sensing data has long benefited the scientific community, other government agencies and nonprofit organizations, it has significant untapped potential for commercialization.  Continue reading

Rare tick turns up in Arkansas

This Rutgers University photo shows three Longhorned ticks: from left, a fully engorged female, a partial engorged female, and an engorged nymph.

A hardy, invasive species of tick that survived a New Jersey winter and subsequently traversed the mid-Atlantic has mysteriously arrived in Arkansas. No one is sure how the Longhorned tick, native to East Asia, arrived in the country, or how it made its way near here.   Continue reading