Category Archives: Science

Don’ts and Dos on Coronavirus

Some views expressed here are controversial. So, do ask your doctor. I hope you have one—not just the HMO or retail clinic “provider.”

Don’t panic. That is always good advice. If you, like the world’s economy, operate on just-in-time inventories, and did not take advice to stock up 3 weeks ago, do not join a mob at a big-box store. Somebody there is no doubt infected. Plus, there’s the risk of getting trampled or injured in a fist fight over the last roll of toilet paper. Most of the world survives without that luxury good. If you have no rice or beans or pasta in the pantry, that is more serious, but you should still avoid mobs if at all possible. Take-out and drive-through places are booming.

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Parents storm state capitals over vaccines

“Baby shots” used to be a boring subject taken for granted. As the number of vaccines grew from seven in the 1980s to 16 requiring 70 doses now, most parents obediently brought their children to the doctor when shots were “due.” The compliance rate was more than 90 percent. Parents who objected for one reason or another just got an exemption from school-attendance mandates and kept quiet. Every state had a medical exemption, most had a religious exemption, and many had easily obtained philosophical or personal-belief exemptions.

Now that states are repealing exemptions, parents are descending on state capitals en masse, many with severely injured children in tow. Thousands rallied outside an Albany courthouse as a lawsuit challenging an end to religious exemptions was heard.

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Google Engineer: Tech dangerous, taking sides

Project Veritas provides this on-the-record interview with Google Sr. Engineer Greg Coppola following a series of insider Google reports, including internal Google documents which exposed political bias, “algorithmic unfairness,” and the use of “blacklists” at YouTube.

Coppola works on artificial intelligence and the Google Assistant:

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Tulsa Teacher discovers calculus flaw

Jonathan Bartlett

Sometimes new discoveries just require asking the right questions. Jonathan Bartlett, a software developer for software development firm ITX, spends his free time teaching at homeschool student co-op programs. Recently, Bartlett discovered a flaw in calculus while trying to find the best way to describe one of the concepts to his students.

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Private moon landing set next

Art depicting SpaceIL’s Beresheet Lander on moon.

The moon’s next visitor is different. SpaceIL’s Beresheet — Hebrew for “In the Beginning” — will become the first privately funded mission to launch from Earth and land on the moon, and the first spacecraft to propel itself over the lunar surface after landing by “hopping” on its rocket engine to a second landing spot.

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